August 24, 2020 Kitchen Scraps

Eating fresh from the garden fills at least three large ex-pretzel tubs a week with kitchen scraps. The plastic containers work great – made of clear plastic so you can see how full it’s getting. If it looks like a weird science experiment – take it out of the house before it explodes. The lid keeps the smell locked away.

Veggie skins, ends and overripe remains are a great source of nitrogen. They can feed your vermicomposting pets (earthworms), become chicken snacks, or get buried in the garden for a microbes’ feast.

Jane dumps her scraps into a black compost bin that sits on a stand. Add leaves (browns), and water, and scraps (greens) and give it a spin or two or three. Then again, when you pass by, at least every other day.

When it’s time to dump the scraps as seen in this video, Jane hesitates a moment before opening the lid. Will there be hideous oozing goo, or insect-infested foliage, or skunk-like fumes?

It is never so dramatic – there are only wet leaves with hardly a trace of its last feeding. It’s nothing short of a miracle that the scraps from a few days ago have disappeared.

A not-so-terrible earthy smell greets your nose after opening the bin. The leaves are hungry for your next batch of cabbage cores, and cucumber skins and carrot ends.

Over a period of weeks the change in the bin is subtle – the leaves lose their definition. At this point stop adding material, keep the pile moist, and continue to give the bin a spin a day to complete the composting process.

Jane doesn’t wait for the entire compost process to finish inside the black bin. She dumps the almost-composted material to the larger compost pile nearby, adding to its bio-mass.

With the black compost bin empty, it will get filled with leafmold and then with next week’s kitchen scraps. The cycle begins again.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

The Gastronomy Gal

Simplicity in food and travel

Organic Gardening Advice & Tips

Organic Gardening tips

My Garden Story

Learning to grow my own food organically

That's All She Wrote

Confessions of A Musing Freak

In Dianes Kitchen

Recipes showing step by step directions with pictures and gadget reviews

WRITERS HELPING WRITERS®

Home of The Bookshelf Muse

alkaplan

Expression through writing

Andrew McDowell

An Author of Many Parts

WritingChallenge.org

Home of the Monthly Twitter Writing Challenge

%d bloggers like this: